Introduction

New research pushes us as far as possible in storing integrated data. It is to put data on a single atom. Humanity produces a lot of data every minute, and now we need to either slow down production or solve the problem of finding better ways to store that data as quickly as possible.

Atoms are the building blocks of all materials and are the minor things on which bit bits (1 or 0) can be stored. Reducing the size of existing hard disks by about 1,000 times.

Scientists have already made progress in storing bits on atoms. But only on a small scale and in highly tight laboratory conditions, which usually mean frigid temperatures.

A New Study

in an exciting development, a new study from a team at Radboud University in the Netherlands presented a new mechanism that could work at room temperature.

An important factor was the selection of materials, single cobalt atoms on a layer of semiconducting black phosphorus.

The other way is to magnetite atoms to store bits. Which changes the usual method of using angular momentum, the way electrons rotate as they rotate around the nucleus.

Instead of the angular momentum used by previous researchers.

We have found a way to make a difference in energy between a few cobalt atom orbits. Now we use the orbital angular momentum of our atomic memory. Which has a much more significant energy barrier and may be applicable to make the single atom memory stable at room temperature.

It may take some time to obtain proof of principle from the computer rather than the informant, but the indicators are promising.

New Materials And Methods to Store Data

new materials and methods may help solve the problem of preserving magnetic atoms that are stable enough to be helpful.

One researcher, alexander khagtorianos, says that what distinguishes permanent magnets is that they have a north and south pole that always has the same direction.

But at the level of a single atom. The north and south poles of the bit begin to reverse and do not know the direction to which they should refer because they become susceptible to their surroundings.

In previous research on single-atom storage. Researchers used frigid temperatures to ensure their stability, low to 40 kelvin or 233°c.

The new experiment also required icy conditions. But scientists predict it will not be as sensitive to rising temperatures as other methods.

Microscope To Examine Atoms to Store Data

as in other studies, the team used a special microscope to examine atoms, a device that uses quantum mechanics tunnels to push electrons through a specific barrier. It may take some time before a laptop or smartphone has the same system. But this study brought us closer to that goal.

You should then be able to save as many photos and videos as possible.

Researcher alexander khagtorianos says this work means that if we can build a real hard drive from all these atoms — and we’re still far from it. We can store thousands of times more information.

We have found a way to make a difference in energy between a few cobalt atom orbits. Now we use the orbital angular momentum of our atomic memory. Which has a much more significant energy barrier and may be applicable to make the single atom memory stable at room temperature.

It may take some time to obtain proof of principle from the computer rather than the informant. But the indicators are promising.

Conclusion

new materials and methods may help solve the problem of preserving magnetic atoms that are stable enough to be helpful.

One researcher, alexander khagtorianos, says that what distinguishes permanent magnets is that they have a north and south pole that always has the same direction.

But at the level of a single atom to store data. The north and south poles of the bit begin to reverse and do not know the direction to which they should refer because they become susceptible to their surroundings.

Review A New Way to Store Data on a Single Atom.

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